NOTE: I am not an insurance agent, I don’t sell any policies, and that is best left to the professionals in the field. This is just mine and my husband Mike’s story. A story about what we wish we knew to protect our family as small business owners. I am sharing primarily because it is a money topic, and many, many people have small businesses that generate at least part of the family’s income each month. I am just going to share our raw story, and our mistake that closed our company, threw us into severe financial difficulty, and took three and a half years to dig out. Also, this post is not about life insurance, the most obvious, or even insurance for our physical business. I want to share the types of insurance that we didn’t know about but can perhaps prevent financial ruin for another family. 

When Mike wanted to start a consulting business in 2011, I was so excited. And it was great. It really was. Mike and I followed the state guide, took all the legal steps, got our licenses and set up our office space in our home. Then we took courses through the Small Business Administration, met with awesome advisors through SCORE. In short, we followed the “rules.” We had a business plan, a (now defunct) website, worked hard, read everything, learned a lot, make a ton of rookie mistakes, embraced them, kept going. After about a year or so, we thought we had it figured out. And for the business, we sorta did.

But today we talk about UNEQ Consulting (pronounced unique), LLC, in the past tense. Because it’s been gone since March of 2014. Because on November 1st 2013, Mike was working at a site in Eufaula, Alabama and fell head first 18 feet off of a ladder. Onto concrete. Yup. In three seconds, our life was changed forever.

Here’s why it’s important. Because what we didn’t do, and really never thought about, was protecting our family as self-employed small business owners. Mike survived the accident. Thank God. Had he passed? This is a different conversation. But Mike survived, with a severe head injury and years of rehabilitation ahead.

So, here’s the short list of what we wish we knew:

• What types of insurance we needed to protect our family- not just the business
• The importance of disability insurance on Mike, or “business continuity” or Key Man insurance.
• That in many states, unemployment insurance is for the employed- just not the self-employed
• And that Social Security has an “exclusionary” period for around five months, where even if you are approved, there is no back pay
• Oh, that we shouldn’t incur debt, because we had debt. For example, credit cards “we paid off every month” until the deductibles started needing to be paid, and I had to choose
• We wish that for all of the business preparation, that we would have been told to go and speak with someone about what we may need for this unlikely situation.

This November 1st 2018 will mark five years since our life changing event. Mike has made an amazing recovery, but it has taken years of digging in and working hard to recover financially. We paid it all in full, including the IRS lien on the house (for back self-employment taxes), and have sworn off debt. We hope that this post reaches just one person who needs to read it. Please share our story with every self-employed person and small business owner you know.

The second definition for “Price” in the Oxford dictionary online is, “an unwelcome experience, event, or action involved as a condition of achieving a desired end,” and the usage example given is, “the price of their success was an entire day spent in discussion.” For many Americans, the price of their credit cards, or driving a car with high payments, or a mortgage payment that is keeping them “house poor” is that unwelcome experience. And a result of that unwelcome experience is debt. And the price of that debt is stress.

Americans are stressed about their financial condition. The price of such worry is costing money in healthcare related to stress, relationship issues related to fights over money, and job productivity decline. A very recent and startling statistic, published by CNBC in March 2018, reveals 30% of Americans are stressed about money, “constantly.” And a whopping 85% reported being stressed “sometimes.” Here is the top reason from the article:

   “Why? Well, 66 percent of adults, including 71 percent of millennials, say it’s because they don’t have a three- month  emergency fund, and 46 percent say it’s because they don’t have any savings set aside in one to cover an unexpected expense like a job loss or medical problem.”

This is not a new phenomenon that all of the sudden Americans are stressed about money. A 2014 report from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau found that seven out of ten American workers say financial stress is their most common cause of stress, and almost half (48%) say they find dealing with their financial situation stressful.

Why am quoting stats when you may be visiting this article for ANSWERS because you are up at night unable to sleep due to money worries? Because you need to realize up front that are not alone. CNBC’s report translates to almost 3 out of 10 Americans are stressed constantly, over 8 out of 10 are stressed sometimes. I know, I know, “my situation is different…” and I know that it is! Everyone’s situation is uniquely theirs.

What I am on a mission to change is the shame, guilt, hopelessness and embarrassment people feel when they are deep in money problems. I think that is so important. Debt is hiding in the households of the American family and it is killing the livelihood of many of us. We need to throw open the curtains and look around and understand we are not alone. You CAN take control of your money and regain your peace of mind. You CAN find people to walk with you. You CAN create the plan that is right for you and your unique situation. And you can get back that good night’s sleep.

The information in this blog post (“post”) is provided for general informational purposes only and may not reflect the current law in your jurisdiction. No information contained in this post should be construed as legal advice from The Law Office of Dawn K. Kennedy or the individual author, nor is it intended to be a substitute for legal counsel on any subject matter. No reader of this post should act or refrain from acting on the basis of any information included in, or accessible through, this Post without seeking the appropriate legal or other professional advice on the particular facts and circumstances at issue from a lawyer licensed in the recipient’s state, country or other appropriate licensing jurisdiction.